10/31/17

Santuario del Santo Cristo: San Juan’s Original Church

The city of San Juan has a rich history in itself, dating back to the days of the Spanish colonial period when it was known before as San Juan del Monte or the town of St. John (the Baptist) of the mountain, owing to San Juan’s hilly elevation. Its storied past is something we will be getting to in the future from time to time but for starters, the Urban Roamer shall take you to the place where the city was born.

Contrary to the belief of some, the church of San Juan we are referring to here is not the one located near Pinaglabanan, the one officially named St. John the Baptist Church. Can’t blame them though since it is after the city’s Catholic patron saint which can cause confusion. Instead, the one we are referring to here is the one alongside F. Blumentritt Street at the old town center. Known before as the San Juan del Monte Church, it is now officially known as the Santuario del Santo Cristo.

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10/11/17

Santo Domingo Church in Quezon City

After World War II, the Santo Domingo Church laid in ruins, as with many of the structures in Intramuros. With the difficulties of reconstruction, not only physically but also emotionally, the caretakers of the now destroyed structures were faced with a dilemma: should they rebuild in the Walled City or start anew elsewhere? Some, like the Archdiocese of Manila, opted to rebuild the Manila Cathedral from the ground up. The Dominicans, however, may have thought the pain of the loss they felt not only with Santo Domingo but also with the old University of Santo Tomas (UST) campus nearby was too much. Thus, they decided to leave the old Santo Domingo be and rebuild what would be the sixth iteration of the church in a new location up north.

That new location would be in Quezon City, the newly-established city and, in 1949, newly-proclaimed capital of the country. In particular, the Dominicans managed to snag a property in the midst of what was then a low-key commercial area right between the City of Manila and what should have been the National Government Center that is the Elliptical Circle and the quadrangles today. They were eager to get back on their feet and start anew and they envisioned Santo Domingo 6.0 as a reflection of postwar recovery while carrying the sense of grandeur that its predecessors had.

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10/4/17

Santo Domingo Church in Intramuros

October every year is a special occasion for one of the metropolis’ most prominent Catholic churches. In particular, this church celebrates two important occasions: the feast day of its Marian patron and the anniversary of its establishment in its current location. And what is this church is the Urban Roamer referring to? Why, it is none other than the Santo Domingo Church in Quezon City, considered to be the one of the largest Catholic churches in Metro Manila.

For us to better appreciate the significance of this landmark, it is important for us to learn its history. For that, we have to first visit the Walled City that is Intramuros in Manila, right where Santo Domingo began. Continue reading

07/19/17

San Sebastian Basilica Up Close

It is remarkable to realize that San Sebastian Basilica has managed to withstand a lot for more than 125 years and counting. It managed to survive earthquakes, typhoons, and war, not to mention the changing urban landscape that has been detrimental to the city’s development after the war. Its significance as a landmark, a heritage structure and an architectural marvel has not diminished and has become an important of Manila’s landscape for more than a century. That’s not to say the San Sebastian Basilica has been without its own challenges. On the contrary, the fact that it is structure made entirely of metal makes it more prone to elements and the costs of maintaining such as huge structure is a challenge in itself.

With the importance of preserving such a landmark an utmost priority, the San Sebastian Basilica Conservation and Development Foundation was established in 2011. Composed of key Augustinian Recollect priests and conservation professionals, among others, the foundation has been the driving force behind the current campaign for the conservation of San Sebastian Basilica that is expected to be completed by 2022.

The ornate pulpit

As a fundraiser to help finance the ongoing conservation efforts and draw greater awareness about the structure, the foundation recently opened San Sebastian Basilica for tours, taking visitors not only inside the church sanctuary, but also up in the choir loft to the belfry, which at the time was the highest point in Manila. It is an opportunity for visitors to see San Sebastian beyond its sacred functions, providing a close look at the technology and engineering behind it that one would not normally see in a place of worship.

The choirloft of San Sebastian

The view from the other side of the ceiling, which evokes the feel of a steel plant or factory rather than a church

One of the bells in San Sebastian Basilica. They were actually from San Sebastian 4.0 which was heavily damaged by an earthquake

It was also an opportunity to learn more not only about San Sebastian but also the challenges it currently faces and the work being done to address them. One of them is the problem of corrosion which is expected of a structure made entirely of metal. But the corrosion that has been a cause of concern is not actually the one that is visible to the eye; in fact such issues are more easily addressed. The real problem is internal corrosion, one that is not visible to the naked eye. Apparently, there was this design flaw in the structure in which water and moisture actually managed to get inside the church through holes that were present in spires. And this would have been undiscovered had not for the study that was done on the entire structure, using small cameras to inspect the internal sections of the church.

There is also the challenge of preserving the paintings in the church, all painted on the church’s metal surface. With the details now greatly faded, there is a pressing need to restore the paintings. However, considering the delicate condition of the metal used in the church, the struggle to balance conserving the metal structure and make it more corrosion-resistant and that of the painting has been a constant struggle that conservationists are trying to accomplish.

The dome above the altar is itself a canvas of different works of art, albeit faded by the years

Considering that very few churches provide such tours that let you go deep inside the church structure, the San Sebastian Basilica tour is one tour everyone should check out. You not get to appreciate more a historic, cultural, and architectural gem, but you also help in the protection of this landmark for years to come.

Trivia: each of the four large round stained glass windows depict one of the writers of the Gospels,, namely Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

For more information about the San Sebastian Basilica conservation efforts, visit the San Sebastian Basilica Conservation and Development Foundation website. You can also visit their Facebook page for information on the tours and how you can join.

Acknowledgements to the San Sebastian Basilica Conservation and Development Foundation

07/13/17

The San Sebastian Basilica’s Story in Steel

So much has been written and said about the San Sebastian Basilica in Manila’s Quiapo district. It is, after all, an iconic structure that has pretty much defined the city’s skyline for more than a century. And if we are going to dig deeper, two reasons can be determined as to why and how it became such an icon. One is the Neo-Gothic inspired architecture that is akin to the churches in Europe. And the other is the method of construction used in building this church, as the first and only structure in the country that is built entirely of metal.

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