11/25/12

The Bonifacio according to Guillermo Tolentino

Surprising as it may seem, there is not really much documentation about that prominent figure in Philippine history that is Andres Bonifacio. In fact, there is only one known photograph of him that exists, and he is wearing not a camisa but a coat and tie. It is the scantiness of information about him, along with the circumstances of his life and death, that the Bonifacio legend began to grow shortly after his infamous death in 1897.

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the Cry of Balintawak monument which now stands in the UP Diliman campus became associated with Bonifacio even though the figure in question is not really him

For a people seeking a tangible symbol of sorts to identify themselves with, a puzzle arose as to how to depict a man like Andres Bonifacio. Thus was born the popular perception of Bonifacio as a man crying out in defiant anger, armed with a bolo on one hand and ready to charge. This image of Bonifacio became the prevalent depiction in many works of art about him that arose over the years, In one prominent example, a monument erected in memory of the First Cry of Balintawak which depicted a man with an unbuttoned camisa  and holding a bolo and a flag was associated with Bonifacio even though it was not actually depicting the man. Continue reading

10/31/10

halina sa La Loma…Cemetery

At this particular time when we remember and “celebrate” all things morbid and frightening,  this roamer has been fortunate for the opportunity to get to visit the metropolis’ oldest cemetery in existence: the La Loma Cemetery.

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Long before the overcrowding of Metro Manila, the area where the cemetery now stands used to be what is considered the hinterlands as urban life back then was only concentrated in Intramuros. The place also bore a hilly terrain, thus the place’s name “La Loma” or “the hills.” Because of its topography and location, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manila found it a a perfect spot to put up their cemetery which they opened sometime in the  1800’s. Continue reading