07/19/17

San Sebastian Basilica Up Close

It is remarkable to realize that San Sebastian Basilica has managed to withstand a lot for more than 125 years and counting. It managed to survive earthquakes, typhoons, and war, not to mention the changing urban landscape that has been detrimental to the city’s development after the war. Its significance as a landmark, a heritage structure and an architectural marvel has not diminished and has become an important of Manila’s landscape for more than a century. That’s not to say the San Sebastian Basilica has been without its own challenges. On the contrary, the fact that it is structure made entirely of metal makes it more prone to elements and the costs of maintaining such as huge structure is a challenge in itself.

With the importance of preserving such a landmark an utmost priority, the San Sebastian Basilica Conservation and Development Foundation was established in 2011. Composed of key Augustinian Recollect priests and conservation professionals, among others, the foundation has been the driving force behind the current campaign for the conservation of San Sebastian Basilica that is expected to be completed by 2022.

The ornate pulpit

As a fundraiser to help finance the ongoing conservation efforts and draw greater awareness about the structure, the foundation recently opened San Sebastian Basilica for tours, taking visitors not only inside the church sanctuary, but also up in the choir loft to the belfry, which at the time was the highest point in Manila. It is an opportunity for visitors to see San Sebastian beyond its sacred functions, providing a close look at the technology and engineering behind it that one would not normally see in a place of worship.

The choirloft of San Sebastian

The view from the other side of the ceiling, which evokes the feel of a steel plant or factory rather than a church

One of the bells in San Sebastian Basilica. They were actually from San Sebastian 4.0 which was heavily damaged by an earthquake

It was also an opportunity to learn more not only about San Sebastian but also the challenges it currently faces and the work being done to address them. One of them is the problem of corrosion which is expected of a structure made entirely of metal. But the corrosion that has been a cause of concern is not actually the one that is visible to the eye; in fact such issues are more easily addressed. The real problem is internal corrosion, one that is not visible to the naked eye. Apparently, there was this design flaw in the structure in which water and moisture actually managed to get inside the church through holes that were present in spires. And this would have been undiscovered had not for the study that was done on the entire structure, using small cameras to inspect the internal sections of the church.

There is also the challenge of preserving the paintings in the church, all painted on the church’s metal surface. With the details now greatly faded, there is a pressing need to restore the paintings. However, considering the delicate condition of the metal used in the church, the struggle to balance conserving the metal structure and make it more corrosion-resistant and that of the painting has been a constant struggle that conservationists are trying to accomplish.

The dome above the altar is itself a canvas of different works of art, albeit faded by the years

Considering that very few churches provide such tours that let you go deep inside the church structure, the San Sebastian Basilica tour is one tour everyone should check out. You not get to appreciate more a historic, cultural, and architectural gem, but you also help in the protection of this landmark for years to come.

Trivia: each of the four large round stained glass windows depict one of the writers of the Gospels,, namely Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

For more information about the San Sebastian Basilica conservation efforts, visit the San Sebastian Basilica Conservation and Development Foundation website. You can also visit their Facebook page for information on the tours and how you can join.

Acknowledgements to the San Sebastian Basilica Conservation and Development Foundation

07/13/17

The San Sebastian Basilica’s Story in Steel

So much has been written and said about the San Sebastian Basilica in Manila’s Quiapo district. It is, after all, an iconic structure that has pretty much defined the city’s skyline for more than a century. And if we are going to dig deeper, two reasons can be determined as to why and how it became such an icon. One is the Neo-Gothic inspired architecture that is akin to the churches in Europe. And the other is the method of construction used in building this church, as the first and only structure in the country that is built entirely of metal.

Continue reading

07/6/17

On The “Erich Billboard” Stunt

It has only been less than a week since July started but it seems there is one big issue that has pretty much defined this month so far. Yup, we’re talking about that “interesting” billboard that popped up in the Manila skyline recently.

The billboard, located at the corner of Claro M. Recto Avenue and Nicanor Reyes (formerly Morayta) Avenue, had an “interesting” premise. An ambitious, even crazy one, some might say. It was depicting a faceless guy holding one of those boxes that would usually contain a ring or necklace but instead contained a coffee bean in this case. Along with it was a message addressed to actress Erich Gonzales, addressing her in her full real name no less, by some guy identified as Xian Gaza saying that he “likes her a latte” (quite overused pun, I say) and asking if he can invite her for coffee.

Continue reading

07/4/17

A Mexican Connection in Intramuros

Mexico evokes many thoughts and emotions among Filipinos, For some, Mexico is associated with the nationality of many of the opponents boxer Manny Pacquiao faced, such as Juan Antonio Barrera, Erik Morales, and Juan Manuel Marquez. For others, it is a country of the telenovelas from which we have come to love people like Thalia and become more fond for cheesy and insane plotlines. And there are those who associate and have grown fond of the country because of its food like the tacos and the burritos.

What many do not realize though is that this appreciation for Mexico goes way, way back. All the way back to November 19/20. 1564, when Spain launched an expedition from its crown colony in Mexico that would finally bring the Philippines under Spanish rule. The expedition led by Miguel Lopez de Legazpi would arrive in the country in February 1565, launching Spain’s colonization campaign, capping off with the establishment of Manila as a city and the colony’s capital on June 24, 1571. Continue reading

06/26/17

Manila’s Reclamation Dreams

As Manila recently celebrated its 446th Araw ng Maynila last June 24, it was an opportunity for some to reminisce about Manila’s glorious past while bemoan the city’s sorry state at present. But if you ask the administration of Mayor Joseph Ejercito Estrada, things are going to be great for the city once again.

Of course, we have been hearing this thing before, multiple times in fact to the point of being cynical and pessimistic whether things will be better for Manila. What is new though is Estrada’s plans to make this a reality. And that plan is: reclamation. Lots of it.

Continue reading